Body language tips for dating


19-Jun-2020 09:04

She said: “But when we’re dating somebody it’s normally a difficult performance for them because dates tend to be in quite a confined space, so either you’re sitting together in a bar or you’re sharing dinner together, so you’ve kind of got nowhere to go or nowhere to hide." So if they’re quite polite you might see what are known as over congruent body language rituals, and that means loads of interest in what you’re saying, lots of eye contact, lots of raised eyebrows, smiling, over congruent laughter when you saying anything remotely funny.

What they’re doing is the biggest fake display because they’re just trying to get it over and done with and be as polite as possible so they can clear off and get back to their social media or dating sites.

This is where body language really comes into play.

So the next time you’re getting ready for that all-important first meeting, remember these body language do’s and don’t’s for sparking a romantic feeling of attraction in him: Don’t: Lean Forward When you lean forward toward a man while you’re sitting or standing, it can feel masculine and aggressive to him. Just tilt your body backwards when you’re around a man, and see what happens.

On the contrary, what men love about us women is our ability to be soft and in touch with our feelings.

He wants to feel relaxed around you, especially if he’s a man with a lot of stress from his job. Keep a watch on where your shoulders are and consciously practice relaxing them and letting them fall.

So you’ll begin to see a little bit of an eye dart - one side to the other - to see if there’s anyone else more interesting that might fancy them.

Also you tend to see rituals that involve the phone.

There are a number of body language signs you can look out for which suggest they are not in to you.Forget conversation, pickup lines, and great texting skills: Body language is the unsung hero of the dating game."Body language isn't as much about the reality of what you're doing, it's about the perceived value of your actions," says Chris Ulrich, senior instructor at the Body Language Institute.